Red-Eared Slider Turtle Facts, Habitat, Diet, Pet Care, Pictures

red water diet

Red-Eared Slider Turtle

The Red-Eared Sl >

Table of Contents

Red-Eared Sl >

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: Testudines Family: Emydidae Genus: Trachemys Scientific Name: Trachemys scripta elegans

Table Of Content

Table of Contents

Scientific >

Red-Eared Sl >

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: Testudines Family: Emydidae Genus: Trachemys Scientific Name: Trachemys scripta elegans

Bacterial infection of eyes

  • Wounds or furry build-up of necrotic matter in the mouth. Not eating, eyes also swollen along with
Bacterial infection of mouth
  • Lethargic or lazy, head held high, limbs weak
Bacterial infection of the respiratory tract
  • Carapace or plastron rot, turned soft or peeling, with possible bleeding/hemorrhage
Bacterial infection of the tissues
  • Red flush on limbs, laziness
Generalized septicemia (blood poisoning)
  • Trouble feeding, soft carapace with distortion, weak legs
Calcium deficiency
  • Fresh wound
Corrosion on rocks or hard surface, fighting
  • Inflammation or swelling on side of head
Ear abscess (mostly due to unhygienic water)

Once any of the above health conditions or illnesses is noticed, your turtle should immediately be taken to a vet clinic to begin immediate medication and treatment.

Gender Differences/Sexual Dimorphism

The two sexes vary greatly. To understand whether a red-eared slider is male or female, look out for the following identification features:

By feet/claws: While the male red-eared slider has got long claws (nails) on their front feet, the claws of the female are comparatively smaller than their male counterpart.

By coloration: The red eye-patches in male are brighter and bigger. The colors and patches of males might vary and change from time to time, during their whole life period, while the females remain the same by appearance throughout their lifetime.

By sex organ: The big, black, sack-like penis of the male turtle is clearly visible, as it periodically everts and retracts the same.

By carapace: The shell of the male is somewhat smaller in size than the female. While the plastron (underside of the shell) of the male is a little concave, the female has it flat.

By size: The male is comparatively smaller in size than the female.

Conservation Status

The red-eared slider has been listed by the IUCN 3.1 under category ‘NT’ or “Near Threatened”.

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