Lipton Diet Green Tea – Weight

diet sweet tea

Lipton Diet Green Tea & Weight

About the Author:

Jill Corleone

Jill Corleone is a registered dietitian and health coach who has been writing and lecturing on diet and health for more than 15 years. Her work has been featured on the Huffington Post, Diabetes Self-Management and in the book “Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation,” edited by John R. Bach, M.D. Corleone holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition.

If you’re trying to lose weight, green tea contains substances that may help boost your efforts. Lipton brand offers a number of different types of calorie-free and diet green teas, but some may be more beneficial than others when it comes to managing weight. Consult your doctor to discuss how Lipton green tea fits into your diet plan.

Green Tea and Weight

To lose weight, you need to create a negative calorie balance by eating less or burning more calories with exercise. The caffeine and catechins — a type of phytochemical — found in green tea increase your body’s calorie-burning capabilities, according to a 2013 article published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. A 2012 review study published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews reported on evidence that green tea does in fact help people lose weight, although the amount is statistically not significant. However, the authors of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition article noted that green tea may help provide the boost you need to prevent a positive calorie balance and weight gain.

Diet Lipton Ready-to-Drink Tea

Diet Mixed Berry Green Tea is the only diet green tea that the Lipton brand offers. This tea is calorie-free and contains a number of ingredients in addition to green tea, including aspartame, citric acid, sodium hexametaphosphate and ascorbic acid, which is vitamin C. Diet Lipton Mixed Berry Green Tea also has 9 milligrams of caffeine per 8-ounce serving, but doesn’t specify the amount of catechins.

Although diet green tea from Lipton is calorie-free, as an artificially-sweetened beverage, it may not make the best choice if you’re trying to lose weight. According to a 2010 review study published in the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, epidemiological evidence suggests an association between the intake of artificial sweeteners and weight gain. The authors of the study noted that artificial sweeteners increase cravings for sweet food and may lead to poor, higher-calorie food choices. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says that artificial sweeteners are OK to include in your diet as long as they are part of an overall healthy diet.

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